Meet the Maker: Sian Elin

This month we talk to designer and illustrator Sian Elin, about her eponymous homeware brand. 

Our conversation with designer and illustrator Sian Elin starts with the creative process behind her vibrant designs - does she have any particular necessities to get the ideas flowing? ‘Boring music is pretty key,’ she laughs, 'I like to have music on while I'm designing, it helps me get into the flow, but it can't be anything too engaging or interesting - I'm very easily distracted!’

Sian recently moved from Cardiff to Bristol, which meant leaving behind her studio space and switching to working from home. Was that a difficult decision to make? 'It wasn't actually that tough, it seems counter-intuitive - a lot of creatives like to have a space away from home in which to work - but I actually prefer working from home,’ she says, ‘it’s more relaxing, I don't have to worry about extra overheads and I mix it up with lecturing work [Sian is visiting lecturer at Cardiff Metropolitan University], or attending trade fairs, so I don’t get too isolated.’’

sianelin-inlay-fabric-footstool.jpg

Having launched her eponymous brand in 2012 - Sian is something of a veteran when it comes to running her own creative business, what has she learnt over the last six years? ‘That starting your own business is never straightforward,’ she says, ‘it’s been brilliant but also a pretty intense few years; the entire process has been full of ups and downs.’

Sian Elin is on a definite ‘up’, with her designs stocked by Fenwicks, Heals and Oliver Bonas, alongside her own online shop. ‘It’s fantastic seeing my work in those stores,’ she says, ‘my friends message me if they spot one of my designs somewhere - it still feels a bit unreal.’

Art and design have always played a large part in Sian’s life - following her Art Foundation year she went on to study Graphic Design at the University of Reading. ‘To be honest, illustration was my first love,’ she says ‘but I thought it was sensible to study something more vocational - to ensure I could get a job at the end of it.’

After graduation, Sian moved into book design working for Oxford University Press and Penguin - and developed a strong understanding of brand, ‘My main aim with Sian Elin was to work creatively on something I loved, but I also wanted to create a thought-through, cohesive brand - and to create a clear design identity.’

Her bold, Scandi designs are unmistakable, so does she feel she’s achieved the cohesion she was aiming for? ‘I’d like to think so… I’ve worked hard to try and create a unique style, and a range of designs which sit well together.’ Her publishing work involved visiting trade fairs, like New Design, in hunt for new illustrators to commission. ‘Increasingly, I’d find myself at trade fairs speaking to designers and illustrators and thinking I’d love to be doing what they’re doing - so I started to build up my own portfolio on the side.’

In 2012 Sian and her partner moved to Israel for six months, which gave her space and time to build her first collection, ‘East Meets West’ inspired by her travels to India, the Middle East and South America. ‘I spent a lot of my time in Israel designing, pulling together the first collection, getting it photographed and ready for launch.’

On return to the UK Sian took the collection to Tent. ‘I thought it was best place to start as a new designer - it’s a great, creative event and it felt more manageable than some of the larger, more corporate fairs.’ Despite her design background, it was something of a nerve-wracking experience ‘I definitely had a bad case of impostor syndrome when it came to launching Sian Elin,’ she says, ‘I was happy with the collection but also hung up on my lack of experience in textiles - it made me worry that I might not have the right background to go it alone.’

Sian’s worries were misplaced, however -  the feedback was positive, and, more significantly, her designs received a lot of positive press attention. ‘The press coverage was unexpected and amazing in terms of what it did to help the business - it was a real kickstart to the whole thing.’

Sian’s design process can take months from initial idea to end product. She begins by collating ideas on a board, including an overview of trends, ‘It’s important to have a sense of trend,’ she explains, ‘and if I can find a way of interpreting that so it fits with my aesthetic then that’s great, but I don’t subscribe to rigidly following trends.’

Next, she starts sketching out ideas; ‘I take my time; working out ways of creating something unique but with a Scandi, bold graphic feel. I enjoy creating work that looks bold from afar, but on closer inspection is full of detail and texture.’  Sian’s hand draws or hand paints her design, then does work on the colour digitally. A range of samples are made - Sian works with manufacturers in the north of England -  then they are reviewed and adjusted until Sian is happy with the end result.  

Sian works on two collections a year, S/S and A/W - how easy is it to get into a good workflow? ‘I can definitely procrastinate with the best of them,’ she laughs, ‘I find that the administrative side of the business can really take over, so I can spend days working on the business and not doing much design.’

‘A big lesson for me over last few years is that I can’t fit design work around everything else - I need headspace before I can do the creative stuff. I feel that if you’re working up something new you need to give it uninterrupted time, so you can get into the flow and allow the space for ideas to develop.’

What’s next for the brand? ‘I’m currently working on the A/W 2018 collection - which will be quite different to what I’ve done before, in terms of both design and the product range. I’m also hoping to get into licensing this year - it seems the natural next step for the business.’

Does she have any advice for designers thinking of launching their own brand? ‘On a practical level - getting your manufacturers and suppliers right can be a long process - expect it to take a while. You also have to get used to the pressure of carrying the business largely on your own.

‘Know that mistakes are inevitable - but you’ll learn from them. Remember it’s important not to beat yourself up and make sure you enjoy the process. It is fantastic to have the creative freedom to do what you love and create work you’re really proud of.’

Quickfire Questions

Describe your work in three words: Scandi. Colourful. Graphic

What are your making rituals? Cup of tea, sparkling water, chilled music, heating on!

Tea or Coffee? Lots of tea and one 'coffee shop' coffee

Mountains or Sea? Both! Preferably at the same time...

Night Owl or Early Bird? Somewhere in-between?!

I wish someone had told me... That working the hardest doesn't always get you the results... it's important to take steps back along the way and assess where you are in order to move forward in the most efficient way.

www.sianelin.com


 

Home tour - Selina Lauck

As we know how much you love the home tours we feature in the print magazine, we decided it was about time we shared a few more lovely homes on here too! Following on from our recent post about how to create a Scandi Minimal interior on a budget, Louise Parker of Studio Gabrielle gives us a tour around the Berlin apartment of interior stylist and blogger, Selina Lauck.

Selina Lauck home tour - interior stylist
Selina Lauck - home tour - hallway

Two years ago, in October 2016, Selina and her boyfriend (and 5 year old dog, Gordin) renovated their one bedroom apartment in Mitte, Berlin, transforming it into a true blend of modern style furnishings and classic original features. Unbelievably, it only took them three months and they did it all by themselves. Selina's home features a mixture of independent brands including Kai Linke, Mad et Len, DCW Éditions, Gurilla, Cooee Design, alongside well-known favourites Alessi, Knoll, Flos, Hay, Normann Copenhagen, Menu and Hem.

“For me, the theory is always ‘less is more’. I like the idea of designing, building or recreating my own furniture with a mix of designer pieces. There, you have a perfect combination of affordable and expensive investments. I do a lot of searching for second-hand design classics because of their good quality they do not really age and sometimes you can get some pretty good deals.” says Selina. 

Selina Lauck - home tour - minimal living room
Selina Lauck Home Tour
Selina Lauck - Home Tour - minimal interior

In the living room, the parquet flooring, molded cornice and panelled doors are stand out original features, but they took work.  Selina and her boyfriend spent hours sanding down the existing wooden floors to reveal their hidden beauty - time well spent as it brings real warmth and character to the space. The architectural elements are painted in the same colour and finish, which accentuates the architectural language beneath, complimented by Matisse's Nadine print prominently in the room.

Selina Lauck- home tour - bedroom
Selina Lauck home tour - bedroom
Selina Lauck - home tour - bedroom

Singing with comfort and minimalist living, Selina's bedroom allows space to relax and breathe. Linen bedding is an essential item as Selina often switches up the styling in this space to suit their changing requirements - with different bedside tables, table lamps and objects. She believes you can only 'feel' if something works when you try it out for a while, especially in a space as important as the bedroom, where it directly affects your wellbeing.

Selina Lauck- home tour - kitchen
Selina Lauck - home tour - marble and wood kitchen
Selina Lauck - home tour - minimal kitchen style

The kitchen offers warmth to the apartment using tan-based tones in two finishes - both in paint above the shelving and wooden base units. This is offset with black accents with Kai Linke's Blasted KL1 pendant lamp and Iittala's Alvar Aalto vase. In this room, Selina decided to replace the original tiles with a new concrete floor, which flows through to the apartment's bathroom offering a seamless transition. And what kitchen could be complete without Noma's 'Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine' cookbook?

GET THE LOOK

Diamond Chair by Knoll, Utility Design, £1003; Henri Matisse ‘Nadia Au Menton Pointu’ Poster, The Conran Shop, £49

Diamond Chair by Knoll, Utility Design, £1003; Henri Matisse ‘Nadia Au Menton Pointu’ Poster, The Conran Shop, £49

Figue Noire Candle by Mad et Len, The Garnered, £75; Mantis BS3 Table Lamp by DCW Éditions, Made in Design, £452
Portrait N by Gurilla, 580 DKK (approx £69); Snaregade Table Round by Menu, Finnish Design Shop, £1691

Portrait N by Gurilla, 580 DKK (approx £69); Snaregade Table Round by Menu, Finnish Design Shop, £1691

Check out Selina's work and blog and follow her on Instagram

91 is pinning... Spring decor

I don't know about you, but I am in serious need for Spring to hurry itself up! A really chilly February here in the UK has had me yearning for those days when you can leave the house without four layers, mornings when you can have breakfast on the patio, and decorating the house with delicate blooms that have popped their heads up in the garden. I'm sure it'll be here soon, but in the meantime, we have been pinning some Spring inspiration in preparation for a Mother's Day feast, an Easter breakfast or simply a relaxed Spring time gathering.....

Styling: Amanda Russell  / Photo: Antonia Attwood for 91 Magazine

Styling: Amanda Russell  / Photo: Antonia Attwood for 91 Magazine

Styling: Laura Sawyer  / Photo: Malcolm Menzies for 91 Magazine

Styling: Laura Sawyer  / Photo: Malcolm Menzies for 91 Magazine

via Hitta Hem

Head to our Pinterest board for more Spring inspiration. We can wait to be able to fling open the doors and feel the sun on our faces! ;) 

An Instagrammer's Guide to: Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY

The Shopkeepers are back to share more instagrammable venues to visit - this time on the other side of the pond, in the super cool neighbourhood of Greenpoint, Brooklyn in New York. Over to you Paula! 

Brooklyn’s neighbourhoods are home to a thriving independent shop scene. On sunny days I love hopping on a ferry to Greenpoint, a great way to travel and the perfect chance to take in the stunning Manhattan skyline views. Once in Greenpoint, there are so many great cafes and independent shops to choose from, these are some of my favourites. (Most are on Franklin Street unless otherwise noted.)

Bakeri - Instagrammers guide to Greenpoint, Brooklun

Bakeri - First stop is Bakeri on Freeman Street for homemade pastries and great coffee. Both the interior and exterior are wonderful, from the tall decorative wooden doors to the over-scale botanical wallpaper by Nathalie Lete.

IG: @bakeribrooklyn

Duke's Liquor Box - Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Duke’s Liquor Box - Duke’s Liquor Box is filled with hard to find whisky, bourbon, gin, vodka and other spirits from small craft & independent makers. I love the vintage details, unique displays, and the lovely red door with gold lettering.

IG: @dukesliquorbox

Home Of The Brave - Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Home of The Brave - Interiors and homewares store Home Of The Brave specialises in fair trade and American-made goods. Visit sister store Wolves Within, a men’s and women’s concept shop, a block away.

IG: @homeofthebravenyc

maman - Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint,Brooklyn

Maman - This charming café has tables suspended by ropes from the ceiling. Maman uses locally sourced ingredients and offers twists on French classics. They are famous for their lavender hot chocolate.

IG: @mamannyc

Adaptations

Adaptations

Porter James

Porter James

Adaptations and Porter James are sister vintage home stores both with Californian influences but completely different vibes. Porter James is predominantly jewel tones, leather and rich dark vintage rugs. Across the street bohemian Adaptations is more millennial pink and cream, wicker and feminine styles.

IG: @porterjamesny / @adaptationsny

Alter - Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Alter - Visit Alter for their wide range of men’s and women’s clothing and accessories as well as their own brand. Check out the original architectural details like the tin ceiling and tiled floor.

IG: alterbrooklyn

Littleneck Outpost - Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Littleneck Outpost - Littleneck Outpost serves coffee and New England classics like lobster rolls and clam chowder. They sell pantry items, vintage goods and antique linen textiles by Patriae.

IG: Littleneck Outpost

Homecoming - Instagrammers guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Homecoming - Coffee shop, flower shop and lifestyle products, Homecoming has something for everyone. Lovely place to sit with a coffee and smell the flowers.

IG: @homecoming

Feng Sway - instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Feng Sway - Nestled amongst the warehouses on Dobbin Street is Feng Sway, an Aladdin’s Cave of fine vintage and exotic plants.

IG: fengsway

Bellocq - instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Bellocq - Before heading home I always love a visit to Bellocq tea atelier. Enter through the red brick storefront into an enchantingly beautiful store selling single-estate teas. A faded aubergine wall is lined with over-sized yellow tea canisters. Drink some tea in the adjacent salon, and enjoy this Instagram beauty.

IG: @bellocq

What a dreamy round up of shops and cafes! See more wonderful boutiques and eateries from around the world over on The Shopkeepers

Instagrammer's guide to Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY

Shopkeeper Spotlight: Maud's House

91 catches up with Hattie Crook, owner of Yorkshire-based contemporary home store Maud’s House.

Nestled in the north Yorkshire Dales, Maud’s House is a warm and welcoming store with everything one’s heart might desire to make a house a home. Tactile ceramics sit alongside unusual textiles, with artwork and gifts from independent designers and accessories sourced from around the world. Behind the counter and the online store is Hattie Crook, who started Maud’s House in the summer of 2016.

Shopkeeper Spotlight: Maud's House

The Skipton store has recently been revamped with a fresh look for Spring and brings together the artistic community feel that Hattie has loved curating. ‘I guess the essence of MH is created by all the people who supply and shop here,’ explains Hattie. ‘Those who share the same or similar aesthetics and outlook as we do, and through this understand each other. And those who appreciate the craft and effort of something handmade, as well as a well-designed printed editorial or beautifully illustrated card.’

Maud's House, independent lifestyle store in Skipton, Yorkshire

The picturesque location of Maud’s House is just one draw of being in Skipton, and Hattie enjoys the independent and creative businesses in the town, as well as the stunning surrounding countryside. ‘I left the city a few years ago now in search of a different approach to working life,’ says Hattie. ‘I knew it was possible to do what you want and most importantly be where you want to be, not restricted by the confines of an office or hectic commute.’  This epiphany is what drew Hattie to opening her own store, creating a free lifestyle that has influenced the aesthetic. ‘In honesty, it was very much a mindful decision, what would be best for our happiness in the long run,’ Hattie admits. ‘There’s an abundance of space to walk and take time out here, a great community of existing and emerging businesses and - most importantly - a network of supportive customers who equally live here to escape their weekday city jobs and enjoy dropping in the shop on a Saturday for a chat and a browse.’

Shopkeeper Spotlight - Maud's House Yorkshire
Hattie of Maud's House lifestyle store

Hattie’s dream was to open a shop that reflected her love for illustration and design and her own personal style, and the items in the store (which was named after Hattie’s great-grandmother) come from a predominantly British design background. ‘I come from a creative background: my dad was a designer and so I had an understanding from an early age of the importance of supporting emerging designers and profiling work I felt had integrity and thought behind it,’ she explains. ‘Alongside Maud’s House, my partner Jonathan runs an illustration and graphic design studio, Little Tail, and between the two of us we are always keeping an eye out for something we’ve not seen before, designers who spark excitement and we feel are a good fit for the shop.’

Maud's House - indie lifestyle store in Skipton, Yorkshire

Hattie is a self-confessed ceramics fan, and now stocks pieces by Laura Bird, Tilly Hemingway, and Alex Sickling, among others, and locally, she has worked with illustrator Olivia Holden, who designed exclusive Christmas cards featuring the shop dog, Lily! ‘A lot of makers and wholesalers approach the shop, but I always message directly the ones I can see working in the shop and online,’ she says.

‘I have a strict rule that we don’t stock anything we don’t love,’ continues Hattie. ‘I always ask myself “would I buy this?” “does it have function?” “would I have this in my home?” “would I give this to someone?’ and if the answer is yes, then it makes it onto our shelves.’ Recent favourites have been the iconic moccasin slippers (‘they are the cosiest clouds to walk around in!’) but Hattie admits that often the small-batch quantities mean that favourite products sell out long before she gets to take them back to her own home. The Maud’s House blog extends the shop beyond the bricks and mortar and delves into more cultural and artistic endeavours across the UK and, indeed, the world.  ‘It was never intentional for my personality to be so present within the Maud’s House brand, we even opted to name the shop after my great grandmother (I get people calling me Maud all the time now),’ Hattie muses. ‘However, when you own such a small business and ultimately you’re the only person doing the day-to-day operations and marketing, it’s hard not to make your voice heard, especially when you’re so passionate about what you do.’

independent magazines at Maud's House lifestyle store

The blog covers indie mags (yay!), new music and shop news, as well as fun cocktails and in-depth features on the designers arriving at the shop. ‘Maud’s House isn’t just a place where you can pick up your bestie’s birthday present or your ace new slippers, it’s about a lifestyle we share with like-minded folk and the topics on the MH Journal reflect that,’ adds Hattie. ‘It’s all the stuff our customers can relate to, particularly our regulars who like to look out for more personal updates.’

Maud's House lifestyle store
Maud's House - independent makers and designers

The blog and the Instagram account portray a cool, creative approach to shop keeping. ‘IG is the main way I connect socially with our online customers, I think it works because it’s so visual and I have fun curating the feed, posting vignettes of the shop much like how I enjoy merchandising products in-store.’ Like many of us, the app opens up a portal into the world outside Hattie’s own, and offers inspiration, as well as the instant interaction with customers. ‘When I’m having a quiet day in Skipton, IG manages to keep me focused on the bigger picture and even just the smallest of comments brightens up my day!’ admits Hattie. ‘I tend not to follow many shops on IG, simply because it can become a distraction from my own creative vision, but on a personal level I receive lots of warm and supportive comments and DM’s from fellow indie owners which is pretty humbling when they’re out there doing amazing things of their own.’

shelves at Maud's House lifestyle store
Maud's House - Shopkeeper Spotlight

Hattie’s positivity and pure love for the business seem to extend to all aspects of running a small indie, and so far she has found that the positives of her job far outweigh the challenges. ‘In the early days, I found that going from working in a bustling creative studio environment to spending the best part of the week working solo from the shop could be quite lonely, without having colleagues to critique your work and give you valuable feedback,’ Hattie says. ‘But as the MH community has grown, so has my confidence - I’m never alone for very long and my ‘team’ is made up of regular customers, some now good friends, who visit on a weekly basis.’ And her advice for budding indie shopkeepers? ‘I think if you’ve got passion, drive and vision then go for it - don’t deliberate, or imitate others, just do it, once you’ve got over the initial hurdles of setting up shop you’ll thank yourself.’

www.maudshouse.co.uk

All photography by Scott Cross

Join our workshop at the Occasional Home Store

You may remember back in September last year we took part in the first Occasional Home Store event in North London - you may even have come along! It was a fab day, with a wonderful collection of indie brands selling their contemporary and vintage homewares. We were thrilled to hear that due to it's success, the Spring edition of the event is happening this March! We won't be selling the magazine this time as we are nearly sold out and the SS18 issue won't have arrived yet, BUT we are excited to announce we will be running our first ever workshop at it instead! 

Photo: Caroline Rowland

Photo: Caroline Rowland

Photo: Tia Talula 

Photo: Tia Talula 

Here is a little bit of info about the workshop we will be running: 

Style, Shoot, Edit & Curate with 91 Magazine: Tips and advice for creating great visual content for your Instagram or blog with the 91 Magazine team.

91 Magazine publishes a biannual print magazine, a quarterly e-zine and a blog, all filled with beautifully curated content and photography. In this workshop, editor Caroline Rowland and 91 photographer Jemma Watts will be sharing their knowledge on how to best style, shoot, edit and curate your own images whether it’s for your Instagram feed or blog. There will also be the chance to have a go at shooting some images on the day under their supervision. Get inspired by their hashtag #seekinspirecreate and you may even see your image published on one of 91’s platforms!

If you'd like to join us it is in Hackney (more info below) on the 3rd March at 1pm-2pm. Tickets are £18. Purchase tickets here.

Photo: Tia Talula 

Photo: Tia Talula 

Photo: Caroline Rowland

Photo: Caroline Rowland

If you just fancy a spot of shopping, then you won't be disappointed as there is another fab line up of sellers this time round. Some featured in the last event such as &Hobbs, Pea Style and Plum & Ashby, plus a few newcomers who we are excited to shop with - Nook shop, Ondine Ash and Meylor Paper Goods, to name a few. The event has a new venue too - this time it's in Hackney at the West Reservoir Centre - so put Saturday 3rd March in your diary folks! We hope to see some of you there! 

www.occasionalhomestore.com

MAKE: a driftwood clothes rail

Open clothes storage is becoming more and more popular with stylish clothes rails being favoured over bulky wardrobes which can often leave your clothes smelling fusty. In our SS17 issue, the home tour with Britt and Sander from Daily Poetry showed how they'd used simple black metal rails and a bookcase to store their clothing - simple but effective (see here

DIY project - make a branch clothes rail

Today we are sharing a DIY project from new book Woodworking on how to make your own branch clothes rail for next to nothing. Apart from some lengths of leather and a few inexpensive tools, you'll just need to invest some time sourcing a suitable piece of wood and then creating and installing it - resulting in a totally unique way to store and display your wardrobe.  

TOOLS & MATERIALS

  • 1 piece of driftwood, approx. 140cm (55 inches) in length. Consider the thickness of the stick as it must be suitable for your chosen hangers.
  • 2 pieces of leather, approx. 3cm (1¼ inches) wide and 5m (16½ feet) long (the length will depend on the height of your ceiling). Natural leather is hard to cut, so we tend to ask our local leather merchant to cut it for us
  • Hammer
  • Sandpaper (#150) 
  • Leather hole punch
  • 2 x 1cm (½ inch) copper or brass nails/studs for each strap
  • Hand saw
  • 2 x strong screws (for attaching wardrobe (closet) to the ceiling)
  • Ruler
  • Electric (hand-held) drill
driftwood clothes hanger - DIY
make a driftwood clothes rail

STEP 01 - Comb your nearest beach for a suitable piece of driftwood, then leave your chosen wood to dry out in the sun.

STEP 02 - Use the sandpaper to clean and polish the rough edges. Run the sandpaper along the stick to make sure there are no splinters or small rough knots.

creating a branch clothes hanger with leather straps

STEP 03 - Using the saw, cut the stick to your desired length. The maximum length would be 150cm (59 inches), to ensure the stick is strong enough.

STEP 04 - Using the leather hole punch, prepare two holes in the leather around 1cm (¹⁄³ inch) inside the edge of the strap and 25cm (10 inches) from the end. You could even ask your leather merchant to cut the holes. Hammer the copper or brass nails or studs into place.

wood and leather clothes hanger

STEP 05 - Loop the leather straps around each end of your chosen branch.

STEP 06 - Check the exact measurement between the two leather straps and mark the two spots on the ceiling where the straps will be attached. Drill holes in the ceiling for the screws and attach the straps to the ceiling.

driftwood clothes rail - DIY project

The branch could literally be hung using any material: rope, rough twine, coarse fabric, even an old fine silk scarf. You can hang it next to a wall as a sort of separate closet, but it also works beautifully as a room divider. And while it’s perfect for holding your clothes in the bedroom, you could also use it as an installation for pots and pans over your kitchen sink, swapping the clothes hangers with some beautiful vintage meat hooks from a butcher. 

If this has got you in the mood for trying your hand working with wood a bit more, then do check out this book - Woodworking by Andrea Brugi and Samina Langholz. Published by Jacqui Small, an imprint of The Quarto Group (£20). Out 22nd March 2018. Pre order now.

DIY Make your own driftwood clothes rail

Shop indie this Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love but it’s also the perfect opportunity to spoil your loved one with a thoughtful gift. Whether it’s an item to wear, goodies to pamper with, something beautiful for the home, or a surprise weekend away, opting for something special from an independent shop will not only impress your loved one with its uniqueness, it also helps to keep our small business community thriving! Stylist Sally Meier has curated a lovely selection of items for both him and her to save you a little bit of work this February!

FOR HER

Pressed Flower Glass Frame Picture, Botanique Workshop, from £9.50 Real flowers are pressed and sandwiched between glass to create these unique framed blooms and leaves. Different sizes are available.

Pressed Flower Glass Frame Picture, Botanique Workshop, from £9.50

Real flowers are pressed and sandwiched between glass to create these unique framed blooms and leaves. Different sizes are available.

Earl Grey Tea & Bergamot Dark Chocolate, The Future Kept, £4.50  Crafted by Coco Chocolatier in Edinburgh, this bar is beautiful inside and out.  

Earl Grey Tea & Bergamot Dark Chocolate, The Future Kept, £4.50 

Crafted by Coco Chocolatier in Edinburgh, this bar is beautiful inside and out.  

Row Bracelets, Bohemia, £28 The Row Bracelets have a simple and delicate gold plated chain with a row of semi-precious stones. Hand-crafted in India and available in four colours, these bracelets are a perfect present, with a canvas gift bag included. 

Row Bracelets, Bohemia, £28

The Row Bracelets have a simple and delicate gold plated chain with a row of semi-precious stones. Hand-crafted in India and available in four colours, these bracelets are a perfect present, with a canvas gift bag included. 

Jewellery Box in White Oak, Tea and Kate, £99 A sleek, sculptural and entirely practical jewellery box for the lady who loves minimal.

Jewellery Box in White Oak, Tea and Kate, £99

A sleek, sculptural and entirely practical jewellery box for the lady who loves minimal.

Woburn Bouquet, Abigail Ahern, £110 Buy flowers that will last forever like these super-realistic faux bouquets from Abigail Ahern. 

Woburn Bouquet, Abigail Ahern, £110

Buy flowers that will last forever like these super-realistic faux bouquets from Abigail Ahern. 

Green Fig Botanical Candle Co, Midgley Green, from £14 These generously sized and practical soy wax candles will transport you to beneath a rambling fig tree in a sunny courtyard. 

Green Fig Botanical Candle Co, Midgley Green, from £14

These generously sized and practical soy wax candles will transport you to beneath a rambling fig tree in a sunny courtyard. 

Old Park Hall, Devon - from £160 per night This quintessential country pile on the Devon and Dorset border is so much more than a B&B. Beautifully decorated, amazing food from local producers and in-house treatment room to enjoy full relaxation. While you are there, visit or even book a cookery course at the local River Cottage!  

Old Park Hall, Devon - from £160 per night

This quintessential country pile on the Devon and Dorset border is so much more than a B&B. Beautifully decorated, amazing food from local producers and in-house treatment room to enjoy full relaxation. While you are there, visit or even book a cookery course at the local River Cottage!  

Moroccan Rose Bath Salts, The Future Kept, £10 These luxurious bath salts are not only pure indulgance, but have healing properties too. Crystals of Himalayan pink salt are hand-crafted with dried petals of rose and scented with Moroccan rose essential oil. 

Moroccan Rose Bath Salts, The Future Kept, £10

These luxurious bath salts are not only pure indulgance, but have healing properties too. Crystals of Himalayan pink salt are hand-crafted with dried petals of rose and scented with Moroccan rose essential oil. 

Bouquet Man Card, Botanique Workshop, £3.50 A pretty card that says it all. 

Bouquet Man Card, Botanique Workshop, £3.50

A pretty card that says it all. 

FOR HIM

Theo 'Slow Brewer' Coffee Brewer, Oggetto, £52.95 Danish design brand Stelton's award winning Theo range is a perfect gift for lovers of slow brew filter coffee.

Theo 'Slow Brewer' Coffee Brewer, Oggetto, £52.95
Danish design brand Stelton's award winning Theo range is a perfect gift for lovers of slow brew filter coffee.

Juniper and Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar by Caro, Caro Somerset, £6.50 Caro has partnered with award-winning chocolatiers, The Chocolate Society, to create chocolate bars inspired by the countryside. 

Juniper and Raspberry Dark Chocolate Bar by Caro, Caro Somerset, £6.50

Caro has partnered with award-winning chocolatiers, The Chocolate Society, to create chocolate bars inspired by the countryside. 

Y Studio Brass mechanical pencil, Tea and Kate, £90 This mechanical pencil is exquisitely crafted in brass and copper to provide the optimum weight, with a smooth and steady feel when writing or drawing.

Y Studio Brass mechanical pencil, Tea and Kate, £90

This mechanical pencil is exquisitely crafted in brass and copper to provide the optimum weight, with a smooth and steady feel when writing or drawing.

These Islands Book, Midgley Green, £45 These Islands is a gorgeous book for any photographer, landscape lover, explorer or coffee drinker looking to be taken away from it all for a moment, or to inspire future trips in the British Isles. 

These Islands Book, Midgley Green, £45

These Islands is a gorgeous book for any photographer, landscape lover, explorer or coffee drinker looking to be taken away from it all for a moment, or to inspire future trips in the British Isles. 

Moebe Oak Frame, Tea and Kate, from £25 Frame a photograph or a special memory in this stylish and simple frame. Available in different sizes and finishes. 

Moebe Oak Frame, Tea and Kate, from £25

Frame a photograph or a special memory in this stylish and simple frame. Available in different sizes and finishes. 

Liberty Print Bow Tie, Botanique Workshop, £29 Made from Liberty print fabric, these bow ties are available in three different prints and will add style and colour to any dapper gent's outfit. You can also purchase a gift set of a matching bow tie and pocket square. 

Liberty Print Bow Tie, Botanique Workshop, £29

Made from Liberty print fabric, these bow ties are available in three different prints and will add style and colour to any dapper gent's outfit. You can also purchase a gift set of a matching bow tie and pocket square. 

Lens Champagne Saucer, Caro Somerset, £14 each These beautiful champagne saucers are the perfect gift combined with a bottle.

Lens Champagne Saucer, Caro Somerset, £14 each

These beautiful champagne saucers are the perfect gift combined with a bottle.

Caroline Gomez Destination Guide, Tea and Kate, £18 A great gift, especially with an accompanying plane ticket tucked inside! The destination travel guide series explores cities from the inside, meets with fascinating people and takes time to see new places in a different way. 

Caroline Gomez Destination Guide, Tea and Kate, £18

A great gift, especially with an accompanying plane ticket tucked inside! The destination travel guide series explores cities from the inside, meets with fascinating people and takes time to see new places in a different way. 

'Cat Love' Greetings Card, Wrap Magazine Shop, £2.50 A fun, simple and romantic card illustrated by Cari Vander Yacht.

'Cat Love' Greetings Card, Wrap Magazine Shop, £2.50

A fun, simple and romantic card illustrated by Cari Vander Yacht.

A gorgeous selection of goodies I'm sure you'll agree?! Forward this post on to drop major hints, or simply treat yourself - why not eh?! Happy Valentines Day all! x

Shop independent this Valentines Day - Gift Guide by 91 Magazine

Meet the Maker: ProjektiTyyny

Nora Nilsson's love of the Scandinavian aesthetic and Indian design has led her to create ProjektiTynny, a beautifully eclectic range of home textiles.

Nora Nilsson’s decision to start ProjektiTyyny began quietly; with an evening at home, sewing. ‘I was just playing around with some fabric and decided to make a cushion,’ she says ‘it was an experiment really, but I was pleased with end result so I posted it on Instagram and didn’t think much more about it.’ The response from her followers was overwhelmingly positive. ‘It was amazing to see all these lovely comments and I thought, hang on, maybe I could do something with this.’

A couple of years later ProjektiTyyny was born - the name is a nod to her Finnish roots, ‘I’m from Finland,’ Nora explains ‘and wanted a Finnish name for my brand, which was simple and self-explanatory so Projekti (project) and Tyyny (cushion) seemed perfect!’

Setting up her own brand was not a new experience for Nora; shortly after graduating from university with a degree in art she launched an underwear brand - her first foray into design and running a business. ‘I really enjoyed having my own brand, and I was selling at some high end stores like Selfridges and Fenwicks but I was offered an amazing opportunity to join the buying office of a major international retailer, so accepted the position and moved into fashion buying.’ We'd also just recently had our first baby so it seemed like a ‘safer’ option.

IMG_1045.jpg

Nora’s time in buying meant working closely with designers and textiles, ‘I tended to buy woven rather than knitted materials - it’s my real forte! My years as a buyer means I really understand the potential of woven cloth and what can be achieved - it’s been fundamental to my design work.’

Buying also involved frequent trips to the Far East and India. ‘Those trips were a real turning point. They gave me the opportunity to see some amazing materials, techniques and the latest developments in fabric weaving.’ She discovered a passion for the aesthetic of Indian textiles in particular. ‘I always brought back treasure from India - and I always knew they’d feature in my home in one shape or form.’

Initially, Nora ran ProjektiTyyny alongside her job in buying. Working full time, whilst trying to build the business proved frustrating; ‘My time was so limited, I felt like I wasn’t giving my all to ProjektiTyyny and that was quickly becoming my priority.’ So, in early 2017 Nora left work for maternity leave - and a decision was made. ‘I had to choose to either go full steam ahead with Tyyny,' she explains, 'or give up and focus on buying. I decided to make the jump and leave my job. It felt risky, but exciting at the same time!’

The risk paid off: ProjektiTyyny has gone from strength to strength and has led to a change of lifestyle with a move from London to West Dorset. ‘We’re now living in the most beautiful countryside,' Nora says, 'I’ve not looked back - I craved a slower, simpler life after 20 years in London.’ The move has also given Nora the opportunity to rent a workspace, five minutes drive from her house. ‘It’s great to finally have somewhere just for the business so I don’t have to burden our home with all the clutter a growing business brings along!’

Nora structures her day around her three children - starting after dropping her eldest two at school, and working in ‘short bursts of productivity’ around Lumi, her youngest child. Work stops once the children are home from school and starts up again once the children are in bed. ‘I think once Lumi starts playschool and I have more solid time in the day, I’ll have a more structured approach,' she says, 'but for now, once she’s napping I work on whatever is next in line whether it’s working on a new design, setting up a new marketing campaign or working on accounts.’

Her design process is ‘layered’ and can be lengthy ‘it can take weeks or months to get from an initial idea to a proto of a product,’ she explains. ‘I collate ideas in a scrapbook, which percolate for a bit before I start designing. I’m inspired by lots of things - nature, people, architecture - I’m always ‘on’ when it comes to finding inspiration. Once I have a design I’m happy with, I create a colour palette - I buy swatches of materials and wool and play around until it’s perfect.’

Nora often weaves a miniature version of her design on a small hand loom to get an idea of what the finished sample will look like. Next, in Nora’s words, comes the hardest part - explaining the design to her maker in India. ‘It often takes a few protos until we get to the point where I’m happy with the product. We’ve worked together for a few years now, but it can be tricky to communicate my vision over email using images and drawings. The next thing on my list is to spend some time in India so we can do all the development face to face.’

Nora’s designs bring together a Scandinavian aesthetic and Indian design - was this blend of styles a deliberate decision? ‘Not really, I didn’t set out to do it but it seemed to happen naturally. I’m Finnish, so the Scandinavian simplistic aesthetic is solidly rooted in me. I grew up in a world of monochrome palettes and simplistic shapes.’

The opposite is true of the intricacies of Indian design… ‘I know! I love simplicity but yet I love so much about Indian weaving techniques. I try and take the elements I love most from both cultures and combine them into something which I’d like to have in my home. People say they love the result - so it seems to work!’

IMG_1029.jpg

Does she ever get creatively blocked? ‘I do, especially if I am trying to design to a specific deadline. I have learnt the best way to deal with it is to keep the process fluid, and not to stop and start. It helps to not worry about seasons or trends - it’s less limiting - and good design is always timeless.’

What advice would she give an aspiring designer? ‘Always follow your heart and never compromise on your designs. It never works. Know that you’ll have long, hard days but remember once you get it right you’ll reap the rewards - working for yourself means the sky is the limit, you are in complete control,’ she says. ‘And it’s hugely satisfying to be doing something every day that you absolutely love.’

IMG_1089.jpg

Quickfire Questions

Describe your work in three words: Luxury home textiles  

What are your making rituals? None for the moment - a little baby means there's no time for rituals!

Tea or Coffee? Tea in the morning and coffee in the afternoon!

Mountains or Sea? Oh this is tricky... I think it would have to be mountains

Night Owl or Early Bird? Early bird definitely

I wish someone had told me… to always have a backup plan and to keep all my receipts in order!

www.projektityyny.com

Stylist's Guide: Scandinavian Minimalism on a budget

Louise Parker of Studio Gabrielle, an interior design & styling agency, investigates the growing trend for Scandinavian Minimalism, enlisting the insight of some experts in the field to discover whether it's possible to achieve the lux aesthetic on a budget...

Scandinavian style stands for simple, calm and pure expression. This makes it easy to grasp, very photogenic and ultimately, attainable for all. But is it affordable for all? Many might associate this look with designer brands and high price tags, but thankfully for those of us who strive style but are on a tight budget, both well-known and independent brands have adopted the trend in order to offer timeless design to the mass market.

In our stylist's guide, we have paired this with the fundamentals of minimalism to buy less, select better and invest in key pieces in order to live better. We talk simple forms and a 'less is more' outlook with a selection of bloggers and stylists who know a thing or two about Scandi Minimalism. Finally, we share some top buys to get the look at the end of the post.

Image: Abi Dare

Image: Abi Dare

Abi Dare, author of These Four Walls / @thesefourwalls

“One of the keys to achieving the minimalist Scandinavian look is choosing colours and window dressings which make the most of natural light - something which need not be expensive at all.

So, for example, try sheer white curtains rather than heavy drapes. And avoid cluttering your rooms with lots of throwaway accessories, which can make spaces feel cramped and constricting. Instead, invest in a few timeless designs that will last for decades to come. Scandinavian brands do these brilliantly and many of their most popular pieces were actually first developed back in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s.

But most of all, focus on creating a comfortable space that you want to spend time in, with lots of texture and warmth. Scandinavian style is supposed to be welcoming and liveable rather than showy, so it lends itself surprisingly well to small budgets.”

Hannah Thinnesen Trickett, author of Hannah in the House / @han_house

“There’s a lot of thought and practicality that goes into creating a Scandinavian minimalist home. When planning my home, I start with a focus on the functionality of each room. There’s no point in creating a minimalist room that serves little function to you as it’s likely you’ll end up buying ‘things’ to compensate for the lack of practical design - creating clutter and foregoing the intended style.

I buy fewer items, choose well and invest in quality. Once I started to live by these standards I’ve become much happier at home. Balancing budget and style is always tricky when you have your eye on key designer pieces. It’s also a confusing message. Budget and designer don’t tend to go hand in hand. However these days it’s quite easy to create a particular style on a budget. Scandinavian minimalism doesn’t mean that the items you buy have to be expensive and designer. The idea is that you choose well. Saying that, if you buy fewer items, you should be able to afford a little more on what you do choose.

If I do buy low-end furniture, with the aim of it being ‘temporary’, it’s responsible to ensure the item can either be rehomed or recycled when it’s no longer needed. Also if you find cheaper items that you will cherish for a long time then that’s a win, it’s not all high-end design classics. My advice if you want to start collecting designer items, start small. I did so with my wine glasses from Iittala and plates from Menu.”

Caroline Birk Bahrenscheer, author of September Edit / @septemberedit:

“It is difficult for me to describe what I do to create Scandinavian minimalism, being a Scandinavian myself. I just do it without thinking.

But in my own interior, I focus on materials like linen, wood, stone and ceramic. I go for a subtle and calming colour scheme, pairing high street objects with more expensive investment pieces. I decorate my walls with minimalist drawings that I do myself and vintage artwork as I like having art that is not easily attainable.”

Carsten Nielsen, designer at Bycdesign studio / @bycdesignstudio:

“I love to create design that doesn’t cost a fortune, as I think everyone should be able to afford art/design on the walls of their homes. Today, there is a massive focus on how to create a harmonic home and that’s something we all put our effort and take great pride in. Creating a nice atmosphere and helping us to relax more.

I love modern art - as well as the mid-century lifestyle because it’s a timeless style that never gets boring. I have a big passion for Bauhaus as well as old Danish architects in furniture design. I love the geometric proverbs, not least the 60’s - when there was a great focus on geometric perspectives. My love of geometry makes me work a lot in the mid-century universe that I love.”

Evalotta & Elin, concept stylist at Sundling Kicken / @sundlingkicken:

“Choose one object that you really love the shape of and let it speak for itself. Put it on a clean surface, like your dining table, window sill or perhaps your living room sideboard. You can add one or two things to complement your favourite piece, just make sure that they don’t steal the show.”

Hege Morris - scandi minimalism on a budget

Hege Morris, author of Hege in France / @hegeinfrance

“To achieve a Scandinavian minimalist look on a budget, it’s important to invest in a couple of key pieces. Buy inexpensive items to compliment them. I’ve found nice items in the most unlikely places. Supermarkets, second-hand shops and markets are good places to find great things. I often use magazines in my styling. Photos from magazines are very effective and they don’t have to cost a fortune. Green plants are another favourite of mine. A couple of inexpensive plants can really change a room.

Good storage solutions are essential for any minimal home, so invest in some nice storage. My favourite at the moment is the IVAR cabinet in pine from Ikea. It’s inexpensive, but painted the same colour as the wall it looks amazing. Display key pieces and add budget finds for a nice minimal Scandi look."

Olivia Atkinson_A Stylists Guide Scandinavian Minimalism

Olivia Atkinson, stylist at Olivia Atkinson Design / @oliviaatkinsondesign:

“I’m always searching eBay for a bargain. Before buying an investment piece, I check online to see if there are any cheaper second-hand ones available. Thrift shops are also a great place to find items, one of my best finds recently was a HAY J77 chair.”

Image: Selina Lauck

Selina Lauck, author of Selina Lauck / @selina.lauck:

“For me, the theory is always ‘less is more’. I like the idea of designing, building or recreating my own furniture with a mix of designer pieces. There, you have a perfect combination of affordable and expensive investments.

I do a lot of searching for second-hand design classics because of their good quality they do not really age and sometimes you can get some pretty good deals.”

GET THE LOOK 

As these experts suggest, investment pieces with budget finds is the best way to create the look for less, so here are some shopping suggestions to get you started! 

Anik Mirror, €63 - 10119 Design / Arnold Circus Stool, £59 - Studio Martino Gamper / Small Glass Flower Pot, £10 - Arket / Atlas Lamp, £444 - KaiLinke / Bellvis Cushion, £25 - Urbanara / Betwa Candle Holder, £16 - Urbanara / Through by Gurilla - approx £69 - wedoart.fo / Viva Glass Teapot With Infuser 1.2l, £28 - Habitat / Drop Chair by Fritz Hansen, £249.90 (on sale) - Nest / Jessen 3 Seater Sofa, £1699 - Someday Designs, Drop Candle Holder by Ichendorf Milano, €18 - Analograum / Collar Vase 12cm Light Grey, approx £22 - Cooee Design

Anik Mirror, €63 - 10119 Design / Arnold Circus Stool, £59 - Studio Martino Gamper / Small Glass Flower Pot, £10 - Arket / Atlas Lamp, £444 - KaiLinke / Bellvis Cushion, £25 - Urbanara / Betwa Candle Holder, £16 - Urbanara / Through by Gurilla - approx £69 - wedoart.fo / Viva Glass Teapot With Infuser 1.2l, £28 - Habitat / Drop Chair by Fritz Hansen, £249.90 (on sale) - Nest / Jessen 3 Seater Sofa, £1699 - Someday Designs, Drop Candle Holder by Ichendorf Milano, €18 - Analograum / Collar Vase 12cm Light Grey, approx £22 - Cooee Design

Teapot 2/3 Cups by Ichendorf Milano, €29.50 - New Forms Design / NY11Bar Chair by Norr11, £215.20 (on sale) - Clippings / November #01, €87 - Aure Studio / Lux Velvet Floor Cushion in Navy Velvet, £69 - Made.com, Hubsch Terrazzo Mirror Round, £31.10 - Einrichten Design / Dipped Chromed Metal LED Desk Lamp, £24 (on sale) - Habitat / Candlestick Holder, £17 - Arket / Glass Jug by Eva Trio, £26.50 - Connox / Silver Mirrored Cube, £40 - Urban Outfitters, Terrazzo Plate Round,- from €20  Analograum, Plate Glazed Porcelain, €22.50 - Tine K Home, Push Coffee Maker by Muuto, £78.32 (on sale) - Nest

Teapot 2/3 Cups by Ichendorf Milano, €29.50 - New Forms Design / NY11Bar Chair by Norr11, £215.20 (on sale) - Clippings / November #01, €87 - Aure Studio / Lux Velvet Floor Cushion in Navy Velvet, £69 - Made.com, Hubsch Terrazzo Mirror Round, £31.10 - Einrichten Design / Dipped Chromed Metal LED Desk Lamp, £24 (on sale) - Habitat / Candlestick Holder, £17 - Arket / Glass Jug by Eva Trio, £26.50 - Connox / Silver Mirrored Cube, £40 - Urban Outfitters, Terrazzo Plate Round,- from €20  Analograum, Plate Glazed Porcelain, €22.50 - Tine K Home, Push Coffee Maker by Muuto, £78.32 (on sale) - Nest

Bell Lamp in Sand by Normann Copenhagen,£164 (on sale) - Made in Design / Jobu Oven Mitt, $60 - Ode to Things, Orb Leather Dining Chair, £319 (on sale) - West Elm, Sarpaneva Cast Iron Pot, £185 - Iittala, Robin Chair, £249 for two - Swoon Editions, Bonbonniere 12cm Black, approx £18 - Cooee Design, Nordic Kitchen Teapot by Eva Solo,£45 - Made in Design / Urban Garden Dishwash 500ml by Meraki, £13 - Design Vintage / Large Vintage Dough Bowl, £85 - Design Vintage, Simple Sand Ceramic Teapot by Bloomingville, £16 - Trouva / Bedside Carafe, $190 - Anna Karlin, Lavitta Chair by Poiat, £371 - Finnish Design Shop

Bell Lamp in Sand by Normann Copenhagen,£164 (on sale) - Made in Design / Jobu Oven Mitt, $60 - Ode to Things, Orb Leather Dining Chair, £319 (on sale) - West Elm, Sarpaneva Cast Iron Pot, £185 - Iittala, Robin Chair, £249 for two - Swoon Editions, Bonbonniere 12cm Black, approx £18 - Cooee Design, Nordic Kitchen Teapot by Eva Solo,£45 - Made in Design / Urban Garden Dishwash 500ml by Meraki, £13 - Design Vintage / Large Vintage Dough Bowl, £85 - Design Vintage, Simple Sand Ceramic Teapot by Bloomingville, £16 - Trouva / Bedside Carafe, $190 - Anna Karlin, Lavitta Chair by Poiat, £371 - Finnish Design Shop

Aida Kitchen Stool, £59 - Swoon Editions, Glass For Champagne, €13.75 - Tine K Home, Organic Bergamot Juniper Shampoo, £12 -Austin Austin, Nomad Chair by We Do Wood, £645 - LOVEThESIGN / Pan/Vegetable Brush by Iris Hantverk, £18 - Trouva / Bardane Clear carafe 1L, £10.50 (on sale) - Habitat, K Lamp in Earthenware, £220 - Vitamin, Vilnia Rug in Sand by Jurate,€99 - Eporta / Ivory Ceramic Small Bowl by House Doctor, £6.95 - Trouva / Aalto Vase Savoy Clear 95mm by Iittala, £48 - Connox / Avery Bistro Table, £90 (on sale) - Urban Outfitters, Tray Circle in Sand, approx £38 - Cooee Design

Aida Kitchen Stool, £59 - Swoon Editions, Glass For Champagne, €13.75 - Tine K Home, Organic Bergamot Juniper Shampoo, £12 -Austin Austin, Nomad Chair by We Do Wood, £645 - LOVEThESIGN / Pan/Vegetable Brush by Iris Hantverk, £18 - Trouva / Bardane Clear carafe 1L, £10.50 (on sale) - Habitat, K Lamp in Earthenware, £220 - Vitamin, Vilnia Rug in Sand by Jurate,€99 - Eporta / Ivory Ceramic Small Bowl by House Doctor, £6.95 - Trouva / Aalto Vase Savoy Clear 95mm by Iittala, £48 - Connox / Avery Bistro Table, £90 (on sale) - Urban Outfitters, Tray Circle in Sand, approx £38 - Cooee Design

Extra Large Jar Vase, £19 - Arket, TR Bulb Table Lamp/Wall Light by Menu, £203.15 - Utility Design / Twisted White Candles, €21.25 for 12 - Tine K Home, Burnt Orange Woven Cotton Rug by Bloomingville, £55 - Trouva / Monroe Mid-Century Sofa in Feather Grey, £1399 - West Elm, Enamel Coffee Kettle by Hario, £49 - Arket /  Aztec Textile Cushion With Tassles by HK Living, €49.95 - OrangeHaus / Simple Sand Ceramic Teacup by Bloomingville, Single Thermal Double Wall 240 Ml Glass, £9 - T&SHOP.

Extra Large Jar Vase, £19 - Arket, TR Bulb Table Lamp/Wall Light by Menu, £203.15 - Utility Design / Twisted White Candles, €21.25 for 12 - Tine K Home, Burnt Orange Woven Cotton Rug by Bloomingville, £55 - Trouva / Monroe Mid-Century Sofa in Feather Grey, £1399 - West Elm, Enamel Coffee Kettle by Hario, £49 - Arket /  Aztec Textile Cushion With Tassles by HK Living, €49.95 - OrangeHaus / Simple Sand Ceramic Teacup by Bloomingville, Single Thermal Double Wall 240 Ml Glass, £9 - T&SHOP.

Complied and written by Louise Parker - Studio Gabrielle / @studiogabrielleuk

Stylists guide to Scandi Minimalism on a budget

Enter the UK Interior Awards

Here at 91, we love to feature homes of real people, homes that have been designed and styled by their owners in a creative way, that reflect fully their lives, personalities and style. We love to champion creativity and small business in all it's forms, from homes and shops and studios, to photography and craft, so when we heard about the UK Interior Awards launching this year, we felt thrilled that real people and what they create at home and at work are going to be rewarded. 

Photo: Jemma Watts - home of Colleen Larmour featured in our SS17 issue

Photo: Jemma Watts - home of Colleen Larmour featured in our SS17 issue

The awards are the brainchild of journalist Abbi Henderson and photographer Georgia Burns. They say: 'We wanted to celebrate humble and unbelievably talented homeowners and small biz owners. Bloggers, designers and both print and online publications are acknowledged by the many fab interiors-focused awards that already exist, however there’s a growing community of interior fanatics on Instagram that aren’t receiving an awful lot of recognition.'

There are nine categories and you can enter more than one. Some categories require a nomination and some you can simply enter yourself into.... 

Nomination required:

  • Most Inspiring Social Channels
  • Best Influencer
  • Best Independent Store
  • Best B&B Interior 

Enter yourself:

  • Best Budget Interior
  • Best Luxury Interior
  • Most Creative Interior
  • Best Room Revamp
  • Best Eye For Interiors

The full details for entering are on the website, entries will open on the 9th February 2018 and close on 23rd March 2018.

Photo Jemma Watts - home of Kelly Love featured in our AW16 issue. 

Photo Jemma Watts - home of Kelly Love featured in our AW16 issue. 

The other exciting news is that as one of the judges, our editor Caroline will select one of the winning homes to feature in a future issue of 91 Magazine! She will be judging alongside stylist Pippa Jameson and print designer Anna Hayman, who you can find out more about here.

So, if you think your home might be worthy, pop the date in your diary and don't forget to nominate your favourite shops, B&Bs and influencers too! Let's all show support to our fellow interior lovers! 

Follow the UK Interior Awards on Instagram for updates and check all the criteria for entering here. Best of luck! 

An Instagrammers Guide to: Dublin

A weekend in the Irish capital of Dublin has much more to offer than a trip to the Guinness factory, with stylish lifestyle stores, speciality coffee shops and tempting eateries popping up across the city. The Shopkeepers share their top spots for capturing insta-worthy shots while you shop, eat and drink your way around the streets of this friendly destination.

arran street east, Dublin

Arran Street East - Arran Street East is a stoneware studio hidden behind Dublin’s Victorian covered market. The Victorian Fruit & Vegetable market in Smithfield inspires the stoneware colour palette, and walking into the studio you are surrounded by beautiful handmade creations amongst fresh flowers straight from the market. If you’re lucky, you can even peek through the back to watch their potter at creating new pieces, all of which are made, glazed and packaged in the studio. Neighbouring Oxmantown, famous for their sandwiches, is Arran Street East’s creative director, Laura Magahy’s, favourite coffee shop.

IG: @arranstreeteast

Find.jpg

Find - Located on Cow's Lane in historic Temple Bar is vintage emporium Find. Filled with antiques, handmade and retro-style goods, there is something for everyone. I always love having a good browse at Find, and am particularly partial to their wonderful range of prints and church art and statuary. The narrow cobbled streets and lanes of Temple Bar are home to several interesting independent shops so have a wander, and there's lots of interesting architectural facades to capture on camera too. 

IG: @findshop

Fish Shop, Dublin

Fish ShopFish Shop on Benburb Street is by far the best fish and chips restaurant to be found in Dublin. This relaxed little wine bar/fish and chip shop has the freshest of fish and will not disappoint. Beautifully decorated with a simple menu, take a seat and rest assured that the wine suggestions will perfectly compliment your mood and dish. If you would like to linger longer over dinner I'd recommend making a reservation at their sister restaurant around the corner on Queen Street which won 'Best Seafood Experience in Ireland' at the 2017 Irish Restaurant Awards.

IG: @fishshopdublin

Industry, Dublin

Industry - Every trip to Dublin must include a visit to lifestyle store Industry. The look is a blend of vintage and modern sourced from around the world; from furniture and lighting to books and home accessories. At the front of the space there is a café serving healthy Middle-eastern style lunches and freshly baked cakes and treats - a great place to sit and take a break, or in warmer weather take a pew outside and watch the passers-by. Read our more in-depth post about this lovely shop here

IG: @industrydesign

Lilliput Press, Dublin

The Lilliput PressThe Lilliput Press is an independent Irish publisher founded in 1984. It is one of the most prestigious publishing houses in Ireland, specialising in Irish interest books with a focus on biographies and historical non-fiction, as well as memoirs. The charming shop front invites you into a room filled with beautiful books and a gorgeous greyhound named Phoebe welcomes you. Across from The Lilliput Press you will also find the Lilliput Stores, a small independent food store selling delicious sandwiches, coffee and a range of seasonal fruit and vegetables.

IG: @lilliputpress

Love Supreme, Dublin

Love SupremeLove Supreme's second coffee shop is located in Portobello and has been nominated 'Best New Cafe' by coffee culture website Sprudge.  A short stroll from the Grand Canal, I have always admired the beautiful historic shopfronts on Lennox Street, but the black and white graphic interior of Love Supreme behind the gridded glass frontage, makes me love them even more.
Stop here for a great coffee accompanied by cake, cookie, sausage roll or pie made in their own mini bakery.

IG: @lovelovesupreme

Lyon Loring, Dublin

Lyon LoringLyón Loring is a charming lifestyle store carrying handpicked vintage products from clothes and jewellery to kitchenware and gifts. They opened this store due to a love of history, specifically the way small pieces - such as jewellery - have such a rich story. All their pieces are handpicked both locally in Ireland or as far afield as San Francisco. 

IG: @lyonloring

Scout, Dublin

ScoutScout owner Wendy Crawford has a keen designer's eye for curating and editing a lovely mix of women and kids clothing, accessories and homewares. Alongside international designers, there is a selection of the best of Irish design, such as knitwear by sought-after design duo Electronic Sheep, baby sized traditional Aran sweaters and ceramics by the award-winning Arran Street East. (see above)

IG: @scoutessexstreetwest

indigo and cloth, Dublin

Indigo and Cloth - Another spot located in the famous in Temple Bar area is Indigo & Cloth, a cafe, menswear store and studio. Arranged over three floors with the cafe on the ground floor, you'll find a great assortment of magazines and accessories, with their menswear range located upstairs.

IG: @indigoandcloth

The garden, Dublin

The Garden - In 2010 Mark Grehan transformed the foyer of Powerscourt Townhouse into a floral oasis. This landmark Georgian building serves as a picture perfect environment for Mark's flower shop - The Garden - from the gorgeous tiled floor to the magnificent architectural doorway details and mantlepiece - making The Garden Instagram gold.

IG: @shopthegarden

Wool Felt Shop, Dublin

The Wool Felt Shop The Wool Felt Shop occupies an old butcher shop which has maintained its original facade, but it’s the little felt mice and sheep that will catch your eye in the window. The Wool Felt Shop also shares the premises with Jennifer Slattery, a textile designer who creates napkins, table runners, place mats and cushions. The Wool Felt Shop is open Friday & Saturday but if you see someone working inside on other days, don’t be shy to give a good knock on the door!

Thanks to Paula and Laura for sharing these great locations. Recently named by Conde Nast as one of the top Instagram accounts to follow for travel, The Shopkeepers is packed full of stunning shops to drool over, so make sure to pay them a visit! 

Instagrammers Guide to Dublin